Thursday, December 14, 2017

Picture of the day for December 15, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on December 15, 2017: Fog and frost on the Lysekil railway at Gåseberg in Lysekil Municipality, Sweden. The railway was inaugurated in 1913 and is still in use. http://ift.tt/2AGCUJX

Wikipedia article of the day for December 15, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for December 15, 2017 is Hawker Hurricane in Yugoslav service.
The Hawker Hurricane fighter aircraft was in Yugoslav service from 1938 to 1941 and 1944 to 1951. The Royal Yugoslav Air Force obtained 24 of the British fighters commencing on 15 December 1938 from early production batches, the first foreign sale of the aircraft. Twenty additional fighter aircraft were built by Zmaj under licence in Yugoslavia. When the country was drawn into World War II by the German-led Axis invasion of April 1941, the aircraft achieved some successes against the Luftwaffe, but all the Yugoslav Hurricanes were destroyed or captured during the 11-day invasion. In mid-1944, the Yugoslav Partisans formed two Royal Air Force squadrons, Nos. 351 and 352, which both operated Hurricane fighter-bombers. No. 351 Squadron flew Hurricane Mk IICs during training and was later equipped with Hurricane Mk IVs, and No. 352 briefly flew Hurricane Mk IICs during training before re-equipping with Supermarine Spitfire Mk Vs. Both squadrons operated as part of No. 281 Wing RAF of the Balkan Air Force, conducting ground attack missions in support of the Partisans. Hurricanes remained in service with the post-war Yugoslav Air Force until the early 1950s.

Research Headlines - Creating high-value chemicals from waste

[Source: Research & Innovation] EU-funded researchers have developed new bio-processes to create high-value chemicals from the waste resulting from bio-diesel production. A true addition to the circular economy, their achievements promise a better and greener chemical industry.

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European Battery Cell R&I Workshop - 11-12 January 2018, Albert Borschette Congress Center (CCAB) - Rue Froissart 36, 1040 Brussels

[Source: Research & Innovation] The European Commission, DG Research and Innovation, is pleased to announce the "European Battery Cell R&I Workshop", that will be held in Brussels on Thursday 11th and Friday 12th January 2018. In the context of "EU Batteries Alliance", an extra budget of € 100 million has become available to finance new topics on batteries to be included in the Horizon 2020 Work Programme for 2019 and 2020.This workshop is a great opportunity to set short and medium term priorities by discussing the possible topics descriptions for next generation batteries research. On January 11th in the afternoon, plenary speakers will grasp the state of the art in battery cell R&I and further identify the progresses and challenges in battery cell R&I. On January 12th, in-depth discussions will shed light in the possible topics and provide implications for short-to-medium term strategy on battery cell R&I. Please refer to the discussion paper for the outline of the discussions. Gathering wide range of stakeholders including research organisations, cell manufacturers, material suppliers, OEMs, battery pack/module suppliers and national organisations, this workshop provides an invaluable opportunity to discover latest developments and shape the future of European battery cell R&I.We look forward to welcoming you in Brussels.

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Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Picture of the day for December 14, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on December 14, 2017: First sunbeams sweep over a winter landscape. Path between Put van Nederhorst and Langweerderwielen. Location, Langweerderwielen (Langwarder Wielen) and surroundings, De Fryske Marren, Friesland, Netherlands. http://ift.tt/2yoGdiO

Wikipedia article of the day for December 14, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for December 14, 2017 is Morihei Ueshiba.
Morihei Ueshiba (December 14, 1883 – April 26, 1969) was the founder of the Japanese martial art of aikido. The son of a landowner from Tanabe, he studied martial arts in his youth, and served in the Japanese Army during the Russo-Japanese War. In 1907 he moved to Hokkaidō as the head of a pioneer settlement and studied with Takeda Sōkaku, the founder of Daitō-ryū Aiki-jūjutsu. In 1919 Ueshiba joined the Ōmoto-kyō movement, a Shinto sect, in Ayabe, and opened his first dojo. He accompanied the head of the group, Onisaburo Deguchi, on an expedition to Mongolia in 1924, where they were captured by Chinese troops and returned to Japan. Moving to Tokyo in 1926, he set up the Aikikai Hombu Dojo. He taught at this dojo and others around Japan, including several military academies. After World War II he retired to Iwama, and continued training at a dojo he had set up there. He continued to promote aikido throughout Japan and abroad until the 1960s. Many of his students became noted martial artists in their own right, and aikido is now practiced around the world.

REWARD Final event - 18 April 2018, Vienna, Austria

[Source: Research & Innovation] The REWARD Project is almost completed and we are happy to announce a final stakeholder event together with the dieper project in order to show final REWARD results as well as first (dieper) results. The dieper project is almost midway. We would like to share the REWARD innovations, the results we have achieved in both projects, and our vision for the future of diesel engines at the Transport Research Arena 2018 which will be held from 16-19 April 2018 in Vienna, Austria. The REWARD Project The goal of REWARD is to develop advanced diesel engines that are able to respond to the demands of the future. The REWARD consortium is taking on the challenge of developing diesel powertrains and aftertreatment technologies for the next generation of cleaner passenger cars and light commercial vehicles. As the fuel economy of Diesel engines is substantially higher than for gasoline engines, REWARD plays into this enormous improvement potential to stimulate the development and use of Diesel engines in all vehicle classes.

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Swiss Science Briefing: Towards a European Open Science Cloud - 30 January 2018, Brussels, Belgium

[Source: Research & Innovation] How to harness the power of open data? Getting inspiration from the work of the Swiss Data Science Center. The Briefing, jointly organised by the Mission of Switzerland to the EU and SwissCore, will start with a presentation of Edouard Bugnion, Vice-President of the EPFL and Academic Co-Director of the Swiss Data Science Center (SDSC). He will elaborate on the work of the SDSC, its main challenges and opportunities to secure a ‘truly open global science’. Christophe Rossel, Vice-President of the European Physical Society and member of the Open Science Policy Platform and Jean-Claude Burgelman, Head of Unit ‘Open Data Policy and Science Cloud, Directorate-General Research and Innovation, European Commission, will then join a panel discussion where they will share their insights on the development of the European Open Science Cloud. After the briefing, the participants are welcome to enjoy a networking reception.

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Research Headlines - EU teen suicide prevention programme goes global

[Source: Research & Innovation] An EU-funded project created an interactive suicide prevention programme to promote mental health in teenagers. Following considerable success in a wide-ranging trial involving thousands of students, it is now being used worldwide to save lives.

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JT-60SA cryostat vessel body manufacturing completed and on its way to Japan

[Source: F4E] Following the full completion of the manufacturing, the JT-60SA cryostat vessel body’s 12 large sectors are currently making their way from

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Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Picture of the day for December 13, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on December 13, 2017: Two Soviet MiG-29 aircraft en route to an air show in British Columbia, Canada, are intercepted by F-15 Eagle aircraft of the 21st Tactical Fighter Wing. The Soviet MiG-29s are, for the first time, traveling to the Abbotsford International Airshow in Abbotsford, BC, Canada, to participate in the August 1989 airshow. The USAF F-15 Eagle interceptors actively guarding North American and United States of America's airspace are with the 21st Tactical Fighter Wing, headquartered at Elmendorf Air Force Base (AFB), Alaska, USA. http://ift.tt/2AfJJhb

Wikipedia article of the day for December 13, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for December 13, 2017 is Nights: Journey of Dreams.
Nights: Journey of Dreams is an action video game developed by Sonic Team and published by Sega for the Wii. The sequel to the 1996 Sega Saturn title Nights into Dreams, it was first released in Japan, on 13 December 2007, followed by North America, Australia and Europe. The story follows two children, Will and Helen, who enter a dream world called Nightopia. When their nightmares come to life, they enlist the flying character Nights to help them stop the evil ruler Wizeman from escaping into the real world. The main objective of the game is to fly through rings while gathering keys to access new levels. The game's setting was designed to resemble England, especially parts of London. Development of Journey of Dreams began shortly after the release of Shadow the Hedgehog in 2005, and was headed by Sonic Team veteran Takashi Iizuka. The game received mixed reviews; critics praised its colourful visuals, boss battles and special effects, but most cited its poor control schemes, aesthetics and general gameplay as major flaws.

Success Stories - Smart designs and controls for a smoother, safer drive

[Source: Research & Innovation] Clever chassis designs and dynamic controls that adapt to the terrain are the way forward for safer, greener, better-performing vehicles. But these innovations are complex and costly to develop. Inspired by intelligent systems integration, an EU-backed project is helping to take this emerging technology mainstream.

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Research Headlines - Extracting and recycling vital metals to tackle supply risk

[Source: Research & Innovation] Essential for manufacturing high-tech products, rare earth metals are in short supply. EU-funded research is investigating how to extract rare earth magnets from electric vehicle motors and recycle them, in a move that could also create jobs in Europe's materials sector.

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European Innovation Council - Turning sunlight to sustainable fuel: Commission launches EIC Horizon Prize for Artificial Photosynthesis

[Source: Research & Innovation] The European Commission has launched the second of six European Innovation Council (EIC) Horizon Prizes, on Artificial Photosynthesis, run under Horizon 2020, the EU's research and innovation programme.

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Monday, December 11, 2017

Picture of the day for December 12, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on December 12, 2017: Malachite kingfisher (Corythornis cristatus) on Lake Baringo, Kenya. To celebrate Jamhuri Day which marks Kenya's establishment as a republic on 12 December 1964. http://ift.tt/2z2jb4Y

Wikipedia article of the day for December 12, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for December 12, 2017 is William Beach Thomas.
William Beach Thomas (1868–1957) was a British author and journalist who worked as a war correspondent and wrote about nature and country life. After a short-lived career as a schoolmaster, he began to write articles for newspapers and periodicals, as well as books. During the early part of the First World War he defied military authorities by reporting news stories from the Western Front for his employer, the Daily Mail. He was briefly imprisoned before being granted official accreditation as a war correspondent. His book With the British on the Somme (1917) portrayed the English soldier in a very favourable light. Both France and Britain rewarded him with knighthoods after the war, but Beach Thomas regretted some of his wartime output. His primary interest as an adult was in rural matters. He was an advocate for the creation of national parks in England and Wales, and mourned the decline of traditional village society. He wrote extensively, particularly for The Observer newspaper and The Spectator, a conservative magazine. His book The English Landscape (1938) includes selections from his contributions to Country Life magazine.

Europe delivers to ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility the most powerful beam source to date

[Source: F4E] Commissioning and operation at SPIDER will start in early 2018 opening a new chapter for the heating systems of the biggest fusion device.

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Research Headlines - 'Future world' scenarios to paint a clearer climate change picture

[Source: Research & Innovation] An EU-funded project's 'future world' scenarios are informing the development of innovative tools and measures to help vulnerable communities plan for, and adapt to, the effects of global warming - such as increased flooding, wild fires and extreme weather.

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Sunday, December 10, 2017

Picture of the day for December 11, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on December 11, 2017: Night view of Berlin Hauptbahnhof (English: Berlin Central Station), main railway station in Berlin, Germany. The station came into full operation in May 2006 and is located on the site of the historic Lehrter Bahnhof, which was opened in 1871 as the terminus of the railway linking Berlin with Lehrte (location near Hanover), which later became Germany's most important east-west main line. In 1987, it was extensively renovated to commemorate Berlin's 750th anniversary, and again in 2006 to its current appearance. http://ift.tt/2AJquO8

Wikipedia article of the day for December 11, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for December 11, 2017 is Nigel (bishop of Ely).
Nigel (c. 1100 – 1169) was Treasurer of England under King Henry I, before being appointed to the see, or bishopric, of Ely in 1133. Nigel owed his advancement to his uncle, Roger of Salisbury, a bishop and government minister. Following the accession of Henry I's successor, King Stephen, Nigel remained as treasurer only briefly. He rebelled and deserted to Stephen's rival Matilda, and never regained high office under Stephen. On the king's death, Nigel was returned to the treasurership by the new king, Henry II. In Nigel's second tenure as treasurer, he returned the administration to the practices of Henry I. He withdrew from much of his public work after around 1164, following an attack of paralysis. He was succeeded as treasurer by his son, Richard fitzNeal, whom he had trained in the operations of the Exchequer, or Treasury of England. Most historians have felt that Nigel's administrative abilities were excellent; he is considered to have been more talented as an administrator than as a religious figure.

Saturday, December 9, 2017

Wikipedia article of the day for December 10, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for December 10, 2017 is Convention of 1833.
The Convention of 1833, a political gathering of settlers in Mexican Texas, was one in a series of unsuccessful attempts at political negotiation that eventually led to the Texas Revolution. It followed the Convention of 1832, whose resolutions had not been addressed by the Mexican government. Delegates met in San Felipe de Austin to draft a series of petitions, with the volatile William H. Wharton presiding. Although the convention's agenda largely mirrored that of the Convention of 1832, delegates also agreed to pursue independent statehood for the province, which was at the time part of the state of Coahuila y Tejas. Under the guidance of Sam Houston, former governor of the US state of Tennessee, a committee drafted a state constitution to submit to the Mexican Congress. Stephen F. Austin (pictured) journeyed to Mexico City to present the petitions to the government. Frustrated with the lack of progress, in October Austin wrote a letter encouraging Texans to form their own state government. This letter was forwarded to the Mexican government, and Austin was imprisoned in early 1834.

Picture of the day for December 10, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on December 10, 2017: X-ray crystallography is a tool used for identifying the atomic and molecular structure of a crystal. The movement of the machine during 80 second scan can give different view on how relatively slow scientific measurements can look frozen in time by shutter speed of 90 seconds. http://ift.tt/1QP2nSH

Friday, December 8, 2017

Wikipedia article of the day for December 9, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for December 9, 2017 is Air Mata Iboe.
Air Mata Iboe ('"A Mother's Tears") is a 1941 film from the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia) directed and written by Njoo Cheong Seng. Starring Fifi Young, Rd Ismail, Ali Sarosa, and Ali Joego, it follows a mother who raises her children lovingly but is ultimately betrayed by her wealthy eldest sons, who refuse to take her in when she falls on hard times. Unwilling to burden her destitute daughter, she depends on the kindness of strangers. The black-and-white film, billed as a musical extravaganza, features a soundtrack by R. Koesbini, and an eponymous title song written by Njoo. Eleven keroncong songs (a folk style with Portuguese influences) were written by music director R. Koesbini, who also appeared in the film. The last production completed by Fred Young's Majestic Film Company, Air Mata Iboe was released in December 1941, shortly before the Japanese occupation of the Dutch East Indies. This film, now possibly lost, received positive reviews. Young retook her role in a remake produced under the same title in 1957.

Picture of the day for December 9, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on December 9, 2017: Orthetrum luzonicum, Tricolored Marsh Hawk, is a medium sized dragonfly with blue, yellow and brown markings. This is a juvenile male. http://ift.tt/2kGwSBV

Research Headlines - The industry behind a quieter life

[Source: Research & Innovation] Tackling noise and vibration at the source is critical for a wide range of health reasons. With that in mind, EU-funded researchers have developed new tools to help design and build quieter and safer machinery for transport and industry.

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Thursday, December 7, 2017

Wikipedia article of the day for December 8, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for December 8, 2017 is Ian Johnson (cricketer).
Ian Johnson (8 December 1917 – 9 October 1998) was an Australian cricketer who played 45 Test matches as a slow off-break bowler between 1946 and 1956. He was on Don Bradman's Invincibles team, which went undefeated on their tour of England in 1948. Johnson captured 109 Test wickets at an average of 29.19 runs per wicket and as a lower order batsman made 1,000 runs at an average of 22.92 runs per dismissal. He captained the Australian team in 17 Tests, winning seven and losing five, including two consecutive losses in the Ashes series against England. Urbane, well-spoken and popular with his opponents and the public, he was seen by his teammates as a disciplinarian, and his natural optimism was often seen as naive. After retirement, Johnson worked for a time as a sports commentator, and covered the 1956 Summer Olympics in Melbourne. In 1957 he was appointed Secretary of the Melbourne Cricket Club, remaining in the role for 26 years. In 1982 he was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire for services to cricket.

Picture of the day for December 8, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on December 8, 2017: Großhadern is a Munich U-Bahn station on the U6, opened in 1993. http://ift.tt/2jrDX5P

Life Sciences Baltics 2018 - 26-27 September 2018, Vilnius, Lithuania

[Source: Research & Innovation] Life Sciences Baltics 2018 is the only international forum in the Baltics for world-class biotechnology, pharmaceutical and medical devices experts from all around the world. It provides a unique opportunity to explore the new horizons of partnerships, exchange ideas and seek progress through networking. Discover enormous potential and passion in the field of life sciences in Lithuania and the Baltics – the gateway to emerging markets.

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Measuring and Modelling Cell Migration - 22-23 February 2018, Vienna, Austria

[Source: Research & Innovation] The symposium intends to bring together researchers from the fields of medicine, biology, biophysics, computer science, and mathematics who share an interest in cell migration. I t is based on the EU-funded Marie Skłodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network InCeM (incem.rwth-aachen.de/). The meeting will provide the opportunity for early stage researchers and advanced scientists from academia and industry, as well as internationally acclaimed leaders to engage in interdisciplinary discussions and personal exchange. While all participants are encouraged to present their data, we are pleased to welcome renowned experts as keynote speakers as well.

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Tour d'Europe, Sofia - 29 January 2018, Bulgaria

[Source: Research & Innovation] In autumn 2017 and winter 2018, the RISE (Research, Innovation, Science Experts) group of advisors to Commissioner for Research, Science & Innovation, Carlos Moedas, are touring European capitals to meet with independent experts and think tanks in the field of research and innovation.The Tour d’Europe takes place in the context of President Juncker' initiative of a wide and open reflection on the future direction of the European project.The RISE Tour d’Europe will focus on the field of research and innovation and its role in wider European policy. This involves a dialogue between the RISE group and independent think tanks, not directly connected to national administrations. The participants will be policy advisers, economists, academics, and intellectuals.The RISE group will use the tour to present the findings of their report “Europe’s future: Open Innovation, Open Science, Open to the World”. The national hosts will put forward the main economic and policy perspectives of their country.A final report on Opening R&I for EU’s future will be presented after the end of the tour in mid-2018.

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Tour d'Europe, Turin - 25 January 2018, Italy

[Source: Research & Innovation] In autumn 2017 and winter 2018, the RISE (Research, Innovation, Science Experts) group of advisors to Commissioner for Research, Science & Innovation, Carlos Moedas, are touring European capitals to meet with independent experts and think tanks in the field of research and innovation.The Tour d’Europe takes place in the context of President Juncker' initiative of a wide and open reflection on the future direction of the European project.The RISE Tour d’Europe will focus on the field of research and innovation and its role in wider European policy. This involves a dialogue between the RISE group and independent think tanks, not directly connected to national administrations. The participants will be policy advisers, economists, academics, and intellectuals.The RISE group will use the tour to present the findings of their report “Europe’s future: Open Innovation, Open Science, Open to the World”. The national hosts will put forward the main economic and policy perspectives of their country.A final report on Opening R&I for EU’s future will be presented after the end of the tour in mid-2018. The Turin event is hosted by the Compagnia di San Paolo.

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1st HBP Curriculum workshop series - Cognitive systems for non-specialists - 13-15 March 2018, Munich, Germany

[Source: Research & Innovation] Cognitive systems are devices that are designed to mimic cognitive skills of higher developed biological organisms at varying levels of complexity and performance. Models of these skills can be either abstract functional descriptions from the vast field of cognitive science or detailed simulations of brain circuits from neuroscience. Novel hardware designs and the steadily increasing availability of cheap computing resources have recently yielded remarkable results especially with the latter models. The goal of this course is to provide a definitive introduction to the theory of cognitive systems. Drawing from advances in brain research, the topic is approached from a computational-neuroscientific perspective rather than an abstract-psychological one, bridging the gap between the physical structure of the brain and the logical organization of its cognitive capabilities. Special focus is put on the role of robotics as a means to ground cognitive function in bodies that physically interact within different types of environments.

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Tour d'Europe, Vienna - 15 January 2018, Austria

[Source: Research & Innovation] In autumn 2017 and winter 2018, the RISE (Research, Innovation, Science Experts) group of advisors to Commissioner for Research, Science & Innovation, Carlos Moedas, are touring European capitals to meet with independent experts and think tanks in the field of research and innovation.The Tour d’Europe takes place in the context of President Juncker' initiative of a wide and open reflection on the future direction of the European project.The RISE Tour d’Europe will focus on the field of research and innovation and its role in wider European policy. This involves a dialogue between the RISE group and independent think tanks, not directly connected to national administrations. The participants will be policy advisers, economists, academics, and intellectuals.The RISE group will use the tour to present the findings of their report “Europe’s future: Open Innovation, Open Science, Open to the World”. The national hosts will put forward the main economic and policy perspectives of their country.A final report on Opening R&I for EU’s future will be presented after the end of the tour in mid-2018. The Vienna event is co-hosted by the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG) and the Austrian Institute of Technology.

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Research Headlines - Green manufacturing for the pharmaceutical industry

[Source: Research & Innovation] An EU and industry-funded project has developed environmentally friendly chemistry processes for drug manufacturing. As well as being better for the planet, the new processes will also enable the industry to cut costs and could lead to cheaper medicines for patients.

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Research Headlines - Stimulating the development of new antibiotics

[Source: Research & Innovation] Many advances of modern medicine rely heavily on antibiotics - which can, however, lose their effectiveness over time as bacteria adapt. New types of these precious drugs are urgently needed. EU and industry-funded researchers are looking into ways to foster the required innovation.

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Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Picture of the day for December 7, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on December 7, 2017: HMS Belfast (C35) ship on the River Thames and Tower Bridge in London before sunrise http://ift.tt/2iurjSJ

Wikipedia article of the day for December 7, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for December 7, 2017 is Habits (Stay High).
"Habits (Stay High)" is a song recorded by Swedish singer Tove Lo, self-released as a single in March 2013, and re-released on 6 December 2013 by Universal Music. It appeared on her debut extended play, Truth Serum, and was the lead single from her debut studio album, Queen of the Clouds. Written by Lo and its producers, Ludvig Söderberg and Jakob Jerlström, it is an electropop song featuring a minimal and upbeat electronic instrumentation. The lyrics describe the singer's attempts to forget her previous boyfriend through substance abuse, drinking and other hedonistic practices. The song was well received by most critics, who commended its lyrics and production. It sold over 2.6 million copies in the United States and peaked at number three on the Billboard Hot 100, the highest position on that chart by a Swedish artist since "The Sign" by Ace of Base (1994). The track topped the charts in Poland and Romania, and peaked within the top ten in many countries. The single was named Song of the Year at the 2015 Grammis Awards in Sweden.

Research Headlines - Pioneering citizen manifesto for secure, clean energy

[Source: Research & Innovation] An EU-funded research team has studied the impacts of economics, social cohesion, technology as well as geopolitical and environmental issues on secure and sustainable energy supplies in Europe. They developed a pioneering citizen manifesto for energy governance and the transition to reliable, renewable sources.

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Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Wikipedia article of the day for December 6, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for December 6, 2017 is Halifax Explosion.
The Halifax Explosion was a maritime disaster in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, on the morning of 6 December 1917. SS Mont-Blanc, a French cargo ship laden with high explosives bound for Bordeaux, France, collided with the Norwegian vessel SS Imo in the Narrows, north-west of the upper Halifax Harbour. When a fire on board the French ship ignited her cargo, around 2,000 people were killed by the blast, debris, fires and collapsed buildings, and an estimated 9,000 others were injured. Nearly all structures within an 800-metre (half-mile) radius, including the entire community of Richmond, were obliterated. A pressure wave snapped trees, bent iron rails, demolished buildings, grounded vessels, and scattered fragments of Mont-Blanc for kilometres. A tsunami created by the blast wiped out the community of Mi'kmaq First Nations people who had lived in the Tufts Cove area for generations. The blast was the largest man-made explosion prior to the development of nuclear weapons, releasing the equivalent energy of roughly 2.9 kilotons of TNT (12,000 GJ). There are several memorials to the victims of the explosion in the North End of Halifax.

Picture of the day for December 6, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on December 6, 2017: Panoramic view of Pulkovo Airport in Saint Petersburg, Russia. http://ift.tt/2BEf51r

Information Event: MSCA Research and Innovation Staff Exchange (RISE) 2018, London - 9 January 2018, London, United Kingdom

[Source: Research & Innovation] The UK Research Office (UKRO), in its capacity as UK National Contact Point for the Horizon 2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions (MSCA), is holding an information event in London, UK for UK organisations interested in applying to the 2018 MSCA Research and Innovation Staff Exchange Action (RISE) call, which opened on 22 November 2017 and has a deadline of 21 March 2018.

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Webinar - Implementing a pathway approach for climate change adaptation at the local level - 11 December 2017, Brussels, Belgium

[Source: Research & Innovation] Planning for adaptation and selecting the right measures to implement while coping with a wide range of uncertainties is a challenge for many Covenant of Mayors signatories. The goal of this webinar is to tackle this issue. Has your city already defined or is in the process of defining and assessing options for adaptation measures? At the same time, you are not sure which ones to implement and in which order? And you would like to find out which options to choose for which (uncertain) future climate scenario? Then this webinar is for you. The session will focus on assessing adaptation options and familiarise you in particular with the so-called adaptation pathway approach. This approach helps to prioritise adaptation options and assemble them in pathways: Information gathered during the phase of the risk and vulnerability assessment is used to evaluate the effectiveness of different adaptation options and considered together with the timing to assemble pathways of responses that will tackle previously defined climatic thresholds. Sounds complex? You will be guided through the session by experts from research institutes, who will explain how you can make use of their research findings in your local authority.

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Let’s shape our FOODure - 19 December 2017, Brussels, Belgium

[Source: Research & Innovation] In line with the current policy initiatives, where the development of food authenticity and safety systems is among the priorities of FOOD 2030 and helps to support some targets of the SDGs 2, 3 and 12, the proposed workshop, as final open event of the PRO-METROFOOD project, is an opportunity to discuss how the metrological tools could effectively strengthen the agrofood sector and the role of METROFOOD-RI in designing and implementing future scenarios of food traceability in Europe.

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Research Headlines - Improving quality of urban life for Europe's elderly

[Source: Research & Innovation] The EU-funded GRAGE project is taking an innovative approach to creating harmonious, sustainable and inclusive citizenship for the elderly in Europe's urban areas. Bringing together researchers from diverse fields, the project is also addressing the global challenges of urbanisation, demographic change and environmental distress.

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Research Headlines - New tool to help urban planners prepare for climate change

[Source: Research & Innovation] Climate change-related rising sea level, urban floods and heat waves will cause destruction and take lives in cities. The extent of these impacts will depend on how well and how quickly urban planners implement adaptation measures. The EU-funded RAMSES project has developed methodologies and a handbook to help urban planners estimate damage and adaptation costs, and transform cities.

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Monday, December 4, 2017

Picture of the day for December 5, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on December 5, 2017: View of a path and the Miscanti lake, altiplano of the Antofagasta Region, northern Chile. The brackish water lake, located in Los Flamencos National Reserve, is separated from Miñiques Lake by a lava flow from an eruption of Miñiques volcano. http://ift.tt/2jfsrdN

Wikipedia article of the day for December 5, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for December 5, 2017 is Yellowhammer.
The yellowhammer (Emberiza citrinella) is a Eurasian bird in the bunting family that has been introduced to New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, and the Falkland Islands. The male has a bright yellow head, streaked brown back, chestnut rump and yellow underparts. Other plumages are duller versions of the same pattern. The yellowhammer is common in open areas with some scrubs or trees, and forms small flocks in winter. The song is very similar to that of its closest relative, the pine bunting, with which it interbreeds. Two or three times a year, the female lays 3–5 eggs patterned with a mesh of fine dark lines in a cup nest. The bird's diet is mainly seeds, supplemented by invertebrates in the breeding season. The nest may be raided by rodents or by birds in the crow family, and the adults are hunted by birds of prey. Changes to agricultural practices have led to population declines in western Europe, but the species has a huge range and is not threatened. This conspicuous yellow bird has inspired poems by Robbie Burns and John Clare, and its song has influenced works by Beethoven and Messiaen.

Research Headlines - Making cities more sustainable with better wastewater management

[Source: Research & Innovation] An EU-funded project developed new knowledge and techniques to improve how cities manage their wastewater and make Europe more resilient to climate change.

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Success Stories - Finding better and quicker ways to tackle TB

[Source: Research & Innovation] Tuberculosis is a silent killer. According to the World Health Organisation more than 10 million people were diagnosed with the disease in 2016. The previous year, some 1,8 million people died from it making TB one of the top ten main causes of death globally.

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Press Centre - Higher than global average: European companies jack up investment into research and development

[Source: Research & Innovation] European Union firms have significantly increased their investments in research and development (R&D), rising above the world's average growth rate. While the world's top 2500 companies in terms of investment into R&D increased this investment by 5.8% over 2016, companies with headquarters in the EU did so by 7%, with growth driven mainly by the ICT, health and automotive sectors.

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Sunday, December 3, 2017

Picture of the day for December 4, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on December 4, 2017: "Umschreibung" is an art installation by Olafur Eliasson in Munich. Here the spiral stairs are seen from below at night. http://ift.tt/2iIgVL3

Wikipedia article of the day for December 4, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for December 4, 2017 is Typhoon Omar.
Typhoon Omar of 1992 was the strongest and most destructive typhoon to strike Guam since Typhoon Pamela in 1976. It formed on August 23 from the monsoon trough across the western Pacific Ocean, and made landfall on Guam five days later with winds of 195 km/h (120 mph). The storm caused damage there costing US$457 million, and one death. Strong gusts up to 248 km/h (154 mph) left nearly the entire island without power, disrupting the water system for several days and preventing the island-based Joint Typhoon Warning Center from issuing advisories for 11 days. The storm damaged or destroyed 2,158 houses, leaving 3,000 people homeless. The next day Omar became a super typhoon with sustained winds of 240 km/h (150 mph). Passing well north of the Philippines, it killed 11 people. It weakened significantly before striking eastern Taiwan on September 4; scattered flooding caused three deaths, along with damage worth $65 million, mostly to agriculture. The storm proceeded into eastern China the next day and dissipated on September 9.

Saturday, December 2, 2017

Picture of the day for December 3, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on December 3, 2017: Phacelia tanacetifolia in Kirchspiel, Dülmen, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany http://ift.tt/2AqNhOz

Wikipedia article of the day for December 3, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for December 3, 2017 is American Arts Commemorative Series medallions.
The American Arts Commemorative Series medallions are gold bullion pieces that were produced by the United States Mint from 1980 to 1984. They were sold to compete with the South African Krugerrand and other bullion coins. The series was proposed by North Carolina Senator Jesse Helms after the US Department of the Treasury began selling portions of the national stockpile of gold. At the suggestion of Iowa Representative Jim Leach, the medallions depict Americans notable for their achievements in the arts. President Jimmy Carter signed the authorization into law in November 1978, despite objections from Treasury officials. The medallions were initially sold through mail order; purchasers were required to obtain the day's price by telephone before ordering. Later, the Mint sold them through telemarketing. Mintage ceased after the ten designs approved by Congress were produced. All were struck at the West Point Bullion Depository. The series sold poorly; critics blamed the complicated process by which they were first marketed, and the fact that they were medallions rather than coins.

Friday, December 1, 2017

Picture of the day for December 2, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on December 2, 2017: Wire-tailed swallow, Hirundo smithii, feeding the offspring. http://ift.tt/2i8cRzG

Wikipedia article of the day for December 2, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for December 2, 2017 is Chicago Pile-1.
Chicago Pile-1 was the world's first artificial nuclear reactor. Its construction was part of the Manhattan Project, the Allied effort to create atomic bombs during World War II. It was built by the project's Metallurgical Laboratory at the University of Chicago, under the west viewing stands of the original Stagg Field. The first human-made self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction was initiated there on 2 December 1942, supervised by Enrico Fermi, who described the apparatus as "a crude pile of black bricks and wooden timbers". It contained 45,000 graphite blocks weighing 400 short tons (360 t) used as neutron moderators, and was fueled by 6 short tons (5.4 t) of uranium metal and 50 short tons (45 t) of uranium oxide. In the pile, some of the free neutrons produced by the natural decay of uranium were absorbed by other uranium atoms, causing nuclear fission of those atoms, and the release of additional free neutrons. Unlike most subsequent nuclear reactors, it had no radiation shielding or cooling system as it only operated at very low power – about one-half watt. The site is now a National Historic Landmark.

Research Headlines - Developing a fast, local test for deadly Ebola

[Source: Research & Innovation] Rapid diagnosis is vital for controlling outbreaks of the deadly Ebola virus. Currently this can only be done in complex laboratories and samples from infected patients are dangerous to handle and transport. Faced with this challenge, an EU and industry-funded project is developing fast, local tests to spot infection quickly and safely, helping to contain its spread and saving lives in the process.

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Horizon 2020 Info Day, Kazan - 6 December 2017, Kazan, Russia

[Source: Research & Innovation] Find out how to fund your research with partners from the EU Horizon 2020 is the European Union’s Framework Programme for Research and Innovation. Running from 2014 until 2020 with a budget of nearly €80 billion, Horizon 2020 is the biggest multinational research programme in the world. It funds research in all areas of science and innovation. Horizon 2020 is open to the world – researchers, universities, companies and institutes from all over the world are welcome to participate in research initiatives. View agenda and register http://ift.tt/2zTOzos

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Horizon 2020 Info Day, St. Petersburg - 8 December 2017

[Source: Research & Innovation] Find out how to fund your research with partners from the EU Horizon 2020 is the European Union’s Framework Programme for Research and Innovation. Running from 2014 until 2020 with a budget of nearly €80 billion, Horizon 2020 is the biggest multinational research programme in the world. It funds research in all areas of science and innovation. Horizon 2020 is open to the world – researchers, universities, companies and institutes from all over the world are welcome to participate in research initiatives. View agenda and register http://ift.tt/2BpRUb4

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Research Headlines - HIV study finds no sign of accelerated ageing

[Source: Research & Innovation] Do people living with HIV age more quickly, despite the fact that their infection is well controlled? Concerns have emerged in recent years, and an EU-funded study was launched to look into the matter by exploring links with age-related conditions, with a specific focus on cognitive impairment. No acceleration was observed.

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Thursday, November 30, 2017

Picture of the day for December 1, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on December 1, 2017: Buldern manor at christmas time, Dülmen, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany http://ift.tt/2jyQIL2

Wikipedia article of the day for December 1, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for December 1, 2017 is Beringian wolf.
The Beringian wolf (Canis lupus) lived during the last Ice Age in what is now Alaska, the Yukon, and northern Wyoming. The wolf was more robust, with stronger jaws and teeth, than other Late Pleistocene gray wolves and the comparably sized modern Yukon wolf (Canis lupus pambasileus), but not as strong as the dire wolf. The unique adaptations of the Beringian wolf's skull and dentition allowed it to produce large bite forces while grappling with large prey and predating and scavenging on Pleistocene megafauna. The wolf has been comprehensively studied, yielding new information on the prey species and feeding behavior of prehistoric wolves. The Beringian wolf preyed most often on horse and steppe bison, and also on caribou, mammoth, and woodland musk ox. The species survived well into the Holocene before its extinction at the close of the Ice Age, when cold and dry conditions abated and much of its prey also went extinct. The remains of ancient wolves with similar skulls and dentition have been found in western Beringia (north-east Siberia).

Planning for the manufacturing of ITER’s first wall panels

[Source: F4E] F4E workshop brings together companies to discuss how production could be automated.

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Scientific Advice Mechanism - Commission's top scientific advisers publish opinion on Food from the Oceans

[Source: Research & Innovation] The High Level Group of the Commission's Scientific Advice Mechanism (SAM) has published a new independent scientific opinion on Food from the Oceans. At the request of Karmenu Vella - Commissioner for Environment, Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, on behalf of the European Commission, the scientific advisers answered the question "How can more food and biomass be obtained from the oceans in a way that does not deprive future generations of their benefits?"

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European Innovation Council - Commission launches EIC Horizon Prize for Affordable High-Tech for Humanitarian Aid

[Source: Research & Innovation] The European Commission has launched the first of six European Innovation Council (EIC) Horizon Prizes, on Affordable High-Tech for Humanitarian Aid. EIC Horizon Prizes are part of the European Innovation Council pilot run under Horizon 2020, the EU's Research and Innovation Framework Programme.

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Planning for the manufacturing of ITER’s first wall panels

[Source: F4E] F4E workshop brings together companies to discuss how production could be automated.

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Research Headlines - A mission to control space junk and asteroids

[Source: Research & Innovation] An EU-funded research network has studied the threat of space junk and asteroids, helping to minimise their risks and better protect our planet, satellites and spaceships from potentially catastrophic hits.

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Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Wikipedia article of the day for November 30, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for November 30, 2017 is Fallout 4: Far Harbor.
Fallout 4: Far Harbor is an expansion pack for the 2015 video game Fallout 4, developed by Bethesda Game Studios and published by Bethesda Softworks. It was released in May 2016 for Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. In the aftermath of a cataclysmic nuclear war, the player character is recruited by a detective agency to investigate the disappearance of a young girl. The game's quests and puzzles can be played in first-person or third-person perspective. The puzzles feature a variety of game mechanics, including lasers and building blocks. The expansion was influenced by player feedback, which faulted the base game's dialogue system and showed interest in additional explorable territory. Reviews from critics were generally favorable; the addition of new quests was praised, but there were mixed opinions on the game's atmosphere and its use of fog. The main criticisms were directed at the puzzles, which reviewers thought were a waste of time, unnecessary, or overly frustrating.

Picture of the day for November 30, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on November 30, 2017: Vanessa indica, Indian Red Admiral, is a butterfly found in the higher altitude regions of India. Males commonly imbibe mineralised moisture from damp ground, and also visit dung or decomposing fallen fruit. http://ift.tt/2zQ20FQ

Research Headlines - Virtual reality tackles real security threats

[Source: Research & Innovation] Escalating terrorist threats are making urban areas more dangerous, placing people, government buildings and critical infrastructure at risk. EU-funded researchers have developed a virtual reality platform to provide security forces with unprecedented abilities to prepare for possible attacks - before they can occur in real life.

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EuroScience Open Forum - 9-14 July 2018, Toulouse, France

[Source: Research & Innovation] ESOF (EuroScience Open Forum) is the largest interdisciplinary science meeting in Europe. It is dedicated to scientific research and innovation and offers a unique framework for interaction and debate for scientists, innovators, policy makers, business people, media and the general public. Created in 2004 by EuroScience, this biennial European forum brings together over 4 000 researchers, educators, business actors, policy makers and journalists from all over the world to discuss breakthroughs in science. More than 40% of the participants are students and young researchers. The 8th edition of ESOF will take place in Toulouse, France, from 9 till 14 July 2018. • Taking part in ESOF is a unique opportunity to: • Further knowledge on the challenges and breakthroughs in research, innovation and their relation to society; • Create links, exchange and debate with leaders of the scientific community worldwide in an interdisciplinary context; • Communicate the latest news on scientific research and innovation to an international audience; • Develop a network in view of building a research career.

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Symposium: Measuring Biodiversity and Extinction, Present and Past - 7 January 2018, San Francisco, USA

[Source: Research & Innovation] This symposium marks a knowledge transfer event at the conclusion of a Marie Curie Global Fellowship experience for the organiser, Dr Julia Sigwart (Director, Queen's University Belfast, Marine Laboratory, UK). Changing biodiversity is a major concern for all biologists. Anthropogenic changes to our planet are decreasing species diversity through the negative impacts of pollution, habitat destruction, direct extirpation of species, and climate change. Mass extinction events (and subsequent recoveries) have happened before in Earth’s history, and these provide important context to understand ecological responses to modern environmental change. The work of assessing biodiversity is woven into ecology, environmental science, conservation, phylogenetics, evo-devo, and many other disciplines; yet, ultimately the way we measure species diversity depends on taxonomy and systematics. The aspiration of this symposium, and complementary contributed talks, is to promote better understanding of our common goals and encourage future interdisciplinary discussion on biodiversity dynamics. The symposium will bring together a diverse group of speakers to confront several important themes: 1. How can biologists best respond to the urgent need to identify and conserve diversity? 2.

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Tuesday, November 28, 2017

Wikipedia article of the day for November 29, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for November 29, 2017 is Josephine Butler.
Josephine Butler (1828–1906) was an English feminist and social reformer in the Victorian era. She campaigned for women's suffrage and better education for women. She was instrumental in the 1886 repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts, which had subjected prostitutes to invasive medical examinations, and she founded an organisation to combat similar practices across Europe. After she became aware that English women and children were being sold into prostitution on the continent, her allegations led to the sacking of a Belgian police commissionaire and the imprisonment of his deputy and 12 brothel owners. Josephine fought child prostitution with help from the campaigning editor of The Pall Mall Gazette, William Thomas Stead, leading to the Criminal Law Amendment Act 1885, which raised the age of consent from 13 to 16 years of age. Her final campaign came in the late 1890s, against medical mistreatment of prostitutes in the British Raj. She wrote more than 90 books and pamphlets, including three biographies. Her Christian feminism is celebrated by the Church of England with a Lesser Festival, and Durham University named one of their colleges after her.

Picture of the day for November 29, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on November 29, 2017: A Sukhoi Superjet 100 (RA-97004) of Alenia Aermacchi flying off the coast of Italy near Turin. http://ift.tt/2AdlJhH

Horizon prizes - Commission launches €2 million Horizon Prize in Social Innovation

[Source: Research & Innovation] The European Commission today launched a Horizon Prize in Social Innovation to improve the mobility of older people.

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Research Headlines - Understanding an invisible resource - groundwater

[Source: Research & Innovation] The EU-funded Invisible Waters project is studying groundwater and competing uses in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile to develop an analytical framework for visualising, understanding and ultimately conserving this most vital resource.

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Success Stories - Mimicking reptiles and bug skin for industrial applications

[Source: Research & Innovation] Lizards and bark bugs are more similar than they may at first appear: both have unique ways of dealing with water, and this has caught scientists' eyes. The LiNaBioFluid project hopes to replicate both skin systems in organic and inorganic materials for a wide range of applications.

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Monday, November 27, 2017

Wikipedia article of the day for November 28, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for November 28, 2017 is X-Cops (The X-Files).
"X-Cops" is the twelfth episode of the seventh season of the American science fiction television series The X-Files. Directed by Michael Watkins and written by Vince Gilligan, the installment originally aired on the Fox network in February 2000. In this episode, Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) and Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson), special agents for the Federal Bureau of Investigation, are interviewed for the Fox network reality television program Cops during an X-Files investigation. Mulder, hunting what he believes to be a werewolf, discovers that the monster terrorizing people craves the fear it provokes. While Mulder embraces the publicity of Cops, Scully is more uncomfortable about appearing on national television. "X-Cops" is one of only two X-Files episodes that was shot in real time. The episode has been thematically analyzed for its use of postmodernism and its presentation as reality television. The episode has been named among the best episodes of The X-Files by several reviewers, for its humor and format.

Picture of the day for November 28, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on November 28, 2017: Kiyomizu-dera in Kyoto, Japan, an UNESCO World Heritage Site, is an independent Buddhist temple. http://ift.tt/2AamCrP

Horizon prizes - Commission launches €2 million Horizon Prize in Social Innovation

[Source: Research & Innovation] The European Commission today launched a Horizon Prize in Social Innovation to improve the mobility of older people.

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Research Headlines - New tumour models could lead to more effective treatments

[Source: Research & Innovation] The incidence of cancer in Europe is increasing but many potential new drug treatments are found to be ineffective when tested on patients. An EU and industry-funded project has investigated new models of tumours to help researchers discover more effective treatments and boost survival rates.

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Sunday, November 26, 2017

Picture of the day for November 27, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on November 27, 2017: A concept of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover, a mobile robot for investigating Mars' past or present ability to sustain microbial life. In this picture, the rover examines a rock on Mars with a set of tools at the end of the rover's arm. http://ift.tt/2jZYeTf

Wikipedia article of the day for November 27, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for November 27, 2017 is Battle of Winterthur.
The Battle of Winterthur (27 May 1799) was fought between French forces under André Masséna and elements of the Austrian army under Friedrich Freiherr von Hotze during the War of the Second Coalition, part of the French Revolutionary Wars. The town of Winterthur lies 18 kilometers (11 mi) northeast of Zürich, in Switzerland. Any army holding the town, at the junction of seven crossroads, controlled access to most of Switzerland and entry points into southern Germany. By mid-May 1799, the Austrians had wrested control of parts of Switzerland from the French. After defeating Jean-Baptiste Jourdan's 25,000-man Army of the Danube at the battles of Ostrach and Stockach, the Austrian army prepared to unite its three main forces on the plains surrounding Zürich. The French Army of Switzerland and the Army of the Danube, now both under the command of Masséna, sought to prevent this merger. The Austrians pushed the French out of the Winterthur highlands and consolidated their forces on the plateau north of Zürich, leading to the French defeat in the First Battle of Zürich a few days later.

Saturday, November 25, 2017

Picture of the day for November 26, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on November 26, 2017: The Berca Mud Volcanoes are a geological and botanical reservation located close to Berca in Buzău County, Romania. The phenomenon is caused due to gases that erupt from 3,000 metres (9,800 ft) deep towards the surface, through the underground layers of clay and water, they push up underground salty water and mud, so that they overflow through the mouths of the volcanoes, while the gas emerges as bubbles as you can see in the image. http://ift.tt/2n0lwt6

Wikipedia article of the day for November 26, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for November 26, 2017 is 38th (Welsh) Infantry Division.
The 38th (Welsh) Infantry Division of the British Army was active during the First and the Second World War. The division arrived in France in 1915. In July 1916 at the Battle of the Somme, it captured the strongly held Mametz Wood with the loss of nearly 4,000 men, allowing XV Corps to advance to the next phase of the Somme offensive, the Battle of Bazentin Ridge. A year later it made a successful attack in the Battle of Pilckem Ridge, the opening of the Third Battle of Ypres. In 1918, during the German Spring Offensive and the Allies' subsequent Hundred Days Offensive, the division attacked several fortified German positions. It crossed the Ancre River, broke through the Hindenburg Line and German positions on the River Selle, and ended the war on the Belgian frontier; by then, it was considered one of the Army's elite units. The division was demobilised after the war. It was recreated in September 1939, but never deployed overseas as a division, restricted to home defence duties around the United Kingdom. It was constituted from September 1944 until the end of the war as the 38th Infantry (Reserve) Division, a training formation.

Friday, November 24, 2017

Picture of the day for November 25, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on November 25, 2017: An immature male bee hummingbird (Mellisuga helenae), the smallest bird in the world - it weighs only 1.6 grams. It is endemic to Cuba. Today is the first anniversary of the death of Fidel Castro, President of Cuba for over 31 years. http://ift.tt/2A87UiD

Wikipedia article of the day for November 25, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for November 25, 2017 is New Worlds (magazine).
New Worlds is a British science fiction magazine that began in 1936 as a fanzine called Novae Terrae. It was first published professionally in 1946, edited by John Carnell. It was the leading British science fiction publication during the period to 1960 described by historian Mike Ashley as the magazine's "Golden Age". Early issues featured John Wyndham's "The Living Lies", under his John Beynon alias, and "Inheritance", an early story by Arthur C. Clarke. "Escapement" by J. G. Ballard appeared in the December 1956 issue; this was Ballard's first professionally published work, and he went on to become a significant figure in science fiction in the 1960s. After 1964, when Michael Moorcock became editor, the magazine featured experimental and avant-garde material, and it became the focus of the modernist New Wave of science fiction. Reaction among the science fiction community was mixed, with partisans and opponents of the New Wave debating the merits of New Worlds in the columns of fanzines, such as Speculation. Several of the regular contributors during this period, including Brian Aldiss and Thomas M. Disch, became major names in science fiction.

Research Headlines - High-throughput 3D printers for complex ceramic parts

[Source: Research & Innovation] Additive manufacturing is re-defining what can or cannot be accomplished in the production of parts, and research continues to redefine what can and cannot be accomplished with additive manufacturing. An EU-funded project has set out to break new ground for the 3D printing of complex ceramic components.

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Thursday, November 23, 2017

Picture of the day for November 24, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on November 24, 2017: American red fox (Vulpes vulpes fulvus) http://ift.tt/2mUcVIo

Wikipedia article of the day for November 24, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for November 24, 2017 is Black vulture.
The black vulture (Coragyps atratus) is a bird in the New World vulture family commonly found from the southeastern United States to Central Chile and Uruguay in South America. Despite the similar name and appearance, this species is unrelated to the Eurasian black vulture, an Old World vulture in the family Accipitridae (which includes eagles, hawks, kites and harriers). The American species is the only extant member of the New World vulture genus Coragyps in the family Cathartidae. It inhabits relatively open areas near scattered forests or shrublands. With a wingspan of 1.5 m (4.9 ft), it is a large bird though relatively small for a vulture. It has black plumage, a featherless, grayish-black head and neck, and a short, hooked beak. The black vulture is a scavenger and feeds on carrion, but will also eat eggs or kill newborn animals. In areas populated by humans, it also feeds at garbage dumps. It finds its meals with its keen eyesight and sense of smell. Lacking a syrinx—the vocal organ of birds—its only vocalizations are grunts or low hisses.

Research Headlines - Together for sustainable cities: an international research alliance

[Source: Research & Innovation] The world's cities account for less than 3% of its land surface, but they are already home to much of its population. By 2050, two-thirds of us are projected to live in urban areas, where joined-up management of food, water and energy will be increasingly important. A wave of partly EU-funded projects is about to explore this sustainability issue.

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Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Wikipedia article of the day for November 23, 2017

The Wikipedia article of the day for November 23, 2017 is 1966 New York City smog.
The 1966 New York City smog (November 23–26) was an air-pollution event, with damaging levels of carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, smoke, and haze. Coming during the Thanksgiving holiday weekend, it was the third major smog in New York City, after a similar event in 1953 (pictured) and another in 1963. Leaders of local and state governments announced an alert and asked residents and industry to take voluntary steps to minimize emissions. Health officials advised people with respiratory or heart conditions to stay indoors. The alert ended after a cold front dispersed the smog. It was an environmental disaster with severe public health effects, including 168 deaths, according to a statistical analysis. The smog catalyzed greater national awareness of air pollution as a serious health problem, and became a political issue. With support from presidents Lyndon B. Johnson and Richard Nixon, a series of bills and amendments aimed at regulating air pollution culminated in the 1967 Air Quality Act and the 1970 Clean Air Act.

Picture of the day for November 23, 2017


Wikipedia picture of the day on November 23, 2017: A high purity (99.999 %) rhenium single crystal made by the floating zone process, an ebeam remelted (99.995 %) rhenium bar and as well as a high purity (99.99 % = 4N) 1 cm3 rhenium cube for comparison. http://ift.tt/2A1FkRJ

STEMM Equality Congress - 11-12 October 2018, Amsterdam, Netherlands

[Source: Research & Innovation] The STEMM Equality Congress 2018 will offer delegates an opportunity to hear from and interact with thought leaders in equality, diversity and inclusion strategy, policy and practice in STEMM worldwide. Building on some of the key themes and issues presented during the 2017 congress, 2018 will focus on inter-sectionality, sharing success stories from around the world, practical measures that are working for other organisations, local challenges that organisations are facing, the tools they are using to address these challenges and how these tools can be applied in other countries and regions. In 2018 special attention will be given to presentations from emerging countries and the latest themes. Attended by over 350 leading researchers, policy makers, equality staff, the private sector, academic staff, government representatives and NGOs from across the globe, the 2018 congress offers a perfect opportunity to network, learn and collaborate to achieve greater equality, diversity and inclusion in STEMM.

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Research Headlines - Energy-efficient fuel cell technology

[Source: Research & Innovation] Fuel cell systems are an efficient way of converting chemical energy into electricity so as to reduce emissions and protect the environment. EU-funded research has advanced existing components and designs to develop an optimised version - boosting product lifetime and efficiency, and potential commercial uptake of a sustainable energy solution.

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Research Headlines - An elegant solution to a quantum problem

[Source: Research & Innovation] The theory of electromagnetic polarisation has been under development for more than 150 years since British scientist Michael Faraday provided the first experimental evidence of the interaction between electricity, magnetism and light. An EU-funded project is now helping to fit together the missing pieces of the puzzle.

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Research Headlines - Better drug design: bioengineering and chemical synthesis duo

[Source: Research & Innovation] The EU-funded SWEETOOLS project aims to improve our understanding of the role of sugars in human biology. Exploring optimised versions of biosynthesised proteins combined with chemically synthesised drugs could help the development of novel biomedicines and vaccines targeting, for example, influenza.

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Research Headlines - Breathe easier - smart sensors for healthier indoor air

[Source: Research & Innovation] Stuffy office environments and poor air quality in schools, hospitals and factories could soon be a distant memory thanks to low-cost smart sensor and ventilation-control technology capable of intelligently detecting and removing hazardous airborne substances. The technology was developed through EU-funded research.

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Research Headlines - Creating a shared traffic safety culture

[Source: Research & Innovation] To stay safe on the roads, we need good infrastructure, alert road-users and effective technology. But what about a general safety culture? A team of researchers from countries with very different approaches to road-use is developing a cultural approach to road safety with the ultimate objective of cutting traffic accident numbers.

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Research Headlines - Fighting hunger by cutting food waste

[Source: Research & Innovation] Worldwide, we waste around 1.3 billion tonnes of food a year, while nearly a billion people go hungry. An EU-funded project has created an online community to tackle the problem by sharing knowledge and redistributing food.

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